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Poster: Seto-Kaiba_Is_Stupid Date: Jan 31, 2009 4:16am
Forum: feature_films Subject: I'd looking for 1930's Australian Cinema set during the 1930's

Admittedly 1930's Australia wasn't very pleasant, BUT, I'd still like to see what life was like when my grandma was growing up. So, make that 1930's Australia Cinema set in 1930's Australian suburbia (My grandma remember living in the suburbs during the 1930's/1940's, instantly proving the claims of revisionist "historians" to be false, since they claim suburbs didn't exist until the 1950's, although unlike the 1950's, back then it took several years to build a house. Suburbs can also be seen in some Charlie Chaplin silents I've seen).

This post was modified by Seto-Kaiba_Is_Stupid on 2009-01-31 12:16:55

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Poster: Administrator, Curator, or StaffVideo-Cellar Date: Jan 31, 2009 6:36am
Forum: feature_films Subject: Re: I'd looking for 1930's Australian Cinema set during the 1930's

There are no Australian movies from the 1930s set in the suburbs. In fact there is only one (the remake of "The Sentimental Bloke") that features city living. We pretty much only made, westerns, war movies, outback adventures, rural drama and comedy, historical and musical pictures at the time.

There was a lot of outer urban housing in the 30s but the proximity of the houses, the population density and the mix of residential and commercial properties in the same area means that this is not viewed as suburban living. Suburbs didn't really start up until the post WWII population boom. Many of the suburbs were built to house new immigrants. A great example of this is the town of Elizabeth, South Australia. Others came in major public infrastructure and housing schemes.

In the city there was either high density city living or outer lying, rural living mostly up to the 50s. There were lots of little towns between the farms and suburbanesque housing was limited to very close to the town centre.

I'm an academically trained historian. Revisionist "historian" isn't an insult. If you don't revise history you can never learn from it. The Dragnet version of history ("Just the facts, ma'am") is a fairly boring way to view the world.

The suburb is associated with the population and economic growth of the 1950s because it is one of the distinguishing features of that decade. Historically, Rock'n'Roll is associated with the mid 50s even though it's musicological origins are a decade earlier. The historians who write about the growth in suburbs are generally cultural or social historians. They are usually interested in when a social creation develops a (popular) culture around it. The popular culture of suburban living didn't really manifest until the 1950s.

The best movie I can think of that deals with the origins of suburban living is "Mr Blanding's Builds His Dream House" (1948) with Cary Grant, Myrna Loy and Melvyn Douglas.

This post was modified by Video-Cellar on 2009-01-31 14:36:39

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Poster: Seto-Kaiba_Is_Stupid Date: Jan 31, 2009 6:45am
Forum: feature_films Subject: Re: I'd looking for 1930's Australian Cinema set during the 1930's

So are you saying my grandma is incorrect? OK, then. When I say "revisionist historian", I usually mean people who claim "My Mother, The Car" was more popular than "I Love Lucy". You know, NUTS!

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Poster: Administrator, Curator, or StaffVideo-Cellar Date: Jan 31, 2009 7:31am
Forum: feature_films Subject: Re: I'd looking for 1930's Australian Cinema set during the 1930's

I'm not saying your grandmother is wrong.

There were some areas in the 20s and 30s that undoubtedly look like the suburbs with detached houses and everything. The concept of a "suburb", with a dedicated subdivided housing area, with fully detached houses, quarter acre blocks and neatly trimed lawns didn't exist till the late 40s and they didn't really have a name to it until the 50s. In the 30s etc the outer urban neighbourhoods were not thought of as suburban. You either lived in the city or the country. Outer urban neighbourhoods were "city" and the local rural townships were "country".



This post was modified by Video-Cellar on 2009-01-31 15:31:59

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Poster: Seto-Kaiba_Is_Stupid Date: Jan 31, 2009 7:30am
Forum: feature_films Subject: Re: I'd looking for 1930's Australian Cinema set during the 1930's

I see. And what do you think of people who "John Ritter's Three's Company" aired in the 1950's? Because I have met such people.

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Poster: Administrator, Curator, or StaffVideo-Cellar Date: Jan 31, 2009 7:38am
Forum: feature_films Subject: Re: I'd looking for 1930's Australian Cinema set during the 1930's

I think that they wouldn't win a game of "Pin The Badly Americanised Remake Of The Delightful British Sitcom, 'Man About the House', On The Timeline."

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Poster: Seto-Kaiba_Is_Stupid Date: Jan 31, 2009 7:42am
Forum: feature_films Subject: Re: I'd looking for 1930's Australian Cinema set during the 1930's

Worse yet, I've met people who think "Small Wonder" aired in the 1970's. Gee, it's bad enough they made the show, now people can't even get the decade it was made in right.

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Poster: quigs Date: Feb 12, 2009 7:09pm
Forum: feature_films Subject: Re: I'd looking for 1930's Australian Cinema set during the 1930's

I watched some of "Man of the House" on you tube and it is
refreshingly better.